file Steaming Milk with Breville Cafe Roma

  • tom
  • tom's Avatar Topic Author
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
11 years 2 months ago #2998 by tom
I am completely new to espresso machines, bought a Breville Cafe Roma yesterday on a friends recommendation. I prefer capuccino to espresso so milk steaming & frothing will be important to me from a machine.

Should I be getting water out of the steam wand?

When i set it to steam, the \"Heating\" Light immedieatly goes on and stays on telling me that the thermoblock must be being powered to get hot enough to produce steam. Is the \"Heating\" Light supposed to be always on when steaming? Also as soon as I set it to steam, the pump turns on and stays on. (I think its the pump, its a dull thud every second or so, like a vibration pump I think)

Anyhow, in the 1st 20 seconds of steaming a bit of water pours out and in that period 7.5ml of water is produced. This seems like a lot. I would think introducing water to the milk is not good.

If I let it steam for a while (1 minute), then stop it, replace the pitcher with an empty on, turn it back on and steam again for 1 minute I get another 17ml in that minute. Again seems like a lot since steaming/frothing milk takes a while and there isn't that much milk there in the first place.

I am out of milk now so I can't experiment :(
But I get the feeling even as I start to learn to get a better consistency in the milk, it will be difficult because of the water that the steam wand produces.

Is the water in the milk bad and if so is it unavoidable with this machine? Do I need a boiler machine for decent steaming? I can still return my Roma.

Thanks,

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
11 years 1 month ago #3000 by colin
Replied by colin on topic Steaming Milk with Breville Cafe Roma
We steer people away from any machine that has a thermoblock.
And yes, you should hear some pump action when a thermoblock is working.
Sadly, what you describe is generally how a thermoblock steams milk; not well.

Here at the coffeecrew website, we think the strangest thing to hit the marketplace are these machines with thermoblock boilers.
It is old school. It did not work then and it does not work now.
Obviously, the accountants at Breville wanted to save a couple of dollars and opted for the t-block as opposed to a real boiler.
In short, a thermoblock boiler is a lot like your car radiator -- a long coil of fine copper or steel tubing wrapped around a heat source OR it could also by a piece of cast metal (mystery metal) with a labyrinth water path through it -- again heated by an external source. Thermoblocks are generally manufactured with the cheapest materials available, meant to heat small amounts of water quickly - and yes, your steam is always infused with water.

Here is an excellent article on thermoblocks from one of Australia's best coffee experts.

Our adage: No one who loves espresso coffee would let their water or coffee come in contact with one of these budget nightmares!

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • clovis
  • clovis's Avatar
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
9 years 8 months ago #4011 by clovis
Replied by clovis on topic Steaming Milk with Breville Cafe Roma
I have been using a Breville for a couple of years now and can get some decent coffees out of it. I know colin dismiss it as a useless machine, but I think it's possible to get a good cup when the stars align. The biggest downfall is that it's difficult to get the steam wand to work well after you've pulled a shot or two. You need to steam your milk first, then run water through the porta-filter to heat everything up, and then pull your shot.
First thing is to remember you need to be close to the machine as it's warming up. As soon as the light goes out (indicating the machine is ready) you need to turn the dial to get some steam out. The longer you wait to act after the light goes out, the better chance you won't get decent pressure (and the water you described) out of your steam wand. The light comes back on when your steaming but it doesn't seem to matter. You have to 'break the seal' right away to get a decent steam result. As long as you crack it for a couple of seconds right after it heats up, you can then walk away for a moment or two and you'll find you come back to some decent steam pressure.
I have also found that my machine produces the best coffee if I run water through for 15 seconds before I actually pull a shot. The machine is temperamental but works okay most days now that I've figured it out.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
9 years 8 months ago #4013 by colin
Replied by colin on topic Steaming Milk with Breville Cafe Roma
clovis wrote:

I have been using a Breville for a couple of years now and can get some decent coffees out of it. I know colin dismiss it as a useless machine,


Come again?

I dare you to find a quote where I say the Breville is worthless.

The Breville is a back-wards looking piece of technology - I would not generally say that it is worthless.

Every coffee maker has merit - even the perc.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • clovis
  • clovis's Avatar
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
9 years 7 months ago #4028 by clovis
Replied by clovis on topic Steaming Milk with Breville Cafe Roma
Sorry, just thought I was paraphrasing your 'adage' - "No one who loves espresso coffee would let their water or coffee come in contact with one of these budget nightmares!"

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
9 years 7 months ago #4029 by colin
Replied by colin on topic Steaming Milk with Breville Cafe Roma
clovis wrote:

Sorry, just thought I was paraphrasing your 'adage' - "No one who loves espresso coffee would let their water or coffee come in contact with one of these budget nightmares!"


That is what I am talking about!

Dang I wish I had said that...

Tee-hee.

:ohmy:

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.041 seconds